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    Recent Landcare Projects

    Quollity Koala Corridors & Questions (2015-17)

    Southern New England Landcare members, in partnership with Citizens Wildlife Corridors have been successful in gaining a grant of $96,000 from the NSW Environmental Trust. Members will enhance and protect key wildlife movement corridors by planting new vegetation and protecting remnant vegetation. The Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) and Spotted Tail Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus) are taking centre stage as iconic species being protected. The project will also survey birds as indicator species for assessment of habitat health.

    Land clearing and resulting loss of habitat is a key threatening process to the survival of the Koala and Spotted Tail Quoll. The project aims to provide the development of multiple aspects of wildlife habitat management and to ultimately provide a recovery plan by reducing key threats. The main objective is to improve the extent and ecological integrity of a known koala corridor that extends from the Dangar’s Falls area, north through a wide corridor incorporating Imbota and Yina Nature Reserves and remnant vegetation east and north-east of Armidale, through Puddledock and Duval Nature Reserve, then south to adjoining University of New England properties at "Kirby" research station and the main campus. Koalas and Quolls use this corridor on a continuous basis however sections of the corridor lack tree cover, have insufficient food trees and/or lack understory vital to the ecological health of the corridor.

    To help the survival of these vulnerable species, members will rehabilitate and revegetate 18 sites on 11 properties in this corridor. Participants were selected from Expressions of Interest lodged by members. There are many opportunities for public participation in this project, whether you live in town or on a rural block. Opportunities will include attending information seminars on wildlife management including both passive management (reporting sightings) and active management (helping restore habitat), attending field days for identifying, reporting and monitoring wildlife movements and learning about and planning revegetation projects for habitat restoration.

    Quollity Koala Corridors and Questions runs for two years from July 2015 until June 2017 and perhaps beyond. Project partners include Armidale Dumaresq Council, the University of New England and the Northern Tablelands Local Land Services, who are all dedicated to combining resources with Southern New England Landcare and Citizens Wildlife Corridors to create a long-term wildlife management strategy for the Northern Tablelands.

    Project updates

    The Koalas Are Coming!

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