• (02) 6772 9123
  • mail@snelandcare.org.au

    Landcare News Items

    Calling all Kingstown & Yarrowyck Area Residents

    woodland open foregroundRESIZED

    Do you live in the Kingstown or Yarrowyck area? Are you keen to fire up your old Landcare group, or perhaps just do some Landcare type work on your own place as an individual? Have you ever thought about:

    • Fencing that hard-to-access remnant of native vegetation?
    • Fencing off a creek to assist with easier livestock management?
    • Establishing some shelter belts/wind breaks/wildlife corridors in an open area of your farm?
    • Getting some technical advice on native vegetation?

    Well, opportunities are coming your way soon with the launch of the Turning the tide on threatened species - Regent Honeyeater project and it's related field days.

    Southern New England Landcare Coordinators are keen to help landholders in your area to do some action planning, because these types of activities will be eligible for financial and technical assistance through this project. We look forward to hearing from you! Give us a call on 6772 9123 or mail@snelandcare.org.au.

    Drought Support Available Locally

    DroughtImageVinnies320UPDATE 10.3.19 - the following assistance is no longer available through Vinnies, but we urge you to try contacting The Salvation Army or Rotary (Reg Pierce for Northern and Western NSW on 0417 472 723) for the same style of assistance...

    __________________________

    As this devastating drought continues, remember, you are not alone.

    St Vincent de Paul Society is working locally to roll out this support to farmers in our area. Download a detailed flier here.

    The funding is available for farmers, farm workers and farm suppliers/contractors facing hardship due to drought. It can be used to spend in local communities or to cover urgent bills such as food, petrol and utilities. The $3,000 per household can consist of up to $2,000 in cash and $1,000 in vouchers.

    St Vincent de Paul Society are distributing packages to affected people in the Armidale, Glen Innes, Gunnedah, Gwydir, Inverell, Moree, Narrabri, Tamworth, Tenterfield, Uralla, Walcha and Walgett districts.

    To access this support contact (02) 5776 0200 (Armidale) and one of their representatives will call you back to help your family.

    Volunteers needed please!

    Vinnies in Armidale are looking for volunteers to assist with the large number of incoming drought enquiries. If you can spare some regular time each week for the next few months, please contact Phil Donnan (Armidale) on 02 5776 0200.

    The Drought Communities Programme (DCP) supports communities in the most drought-affected regions of Australia and builds on the more than $5.7 billion in additional Australian Government drought support measures already announced. The Drought Community Support Initiative information page can be found at https://regional.gov.au/regional/programs/drought-communities.aspx

    Managing Native Vegetation On-Farm After Bush Fire

    Burnt tree over fence320Following recent bush fires that devastated both farms and public land around Tingha, Jennings to Sandy Hills, Drake and Tabulam in the Northern Tablelands region, many landholders are now asking how to manage native vegetation on their fire-damaged properties.

    If there is an imminent risk of injury or damage to property landholders can clear native vegetation, including trees. Clearing should be undertaken to the minimum extent necessary.

    Image - If you need to clear fire-impacted fence lines on your property, you can clear tracks to the minimum extent necessary without needing approval. In the Northern Tablelands this minimum extent is a distance of no more than 30 metres total width.

    Feral Fighters Ready for Action

    feral pigs320A call to arms is going out across the Northern Tablelands to arrest invasive species in our landscape.

    With the economic impact of pest animals in NSW estimated to be $170 million, Northern Tablelands Local Land Services are unveiling a program to provide landowners with the tools they need to help manage feral animals.  

    Image - By working together in the Feral Fighters program, a wider knockdown of the target species, in this case feral pigs, can be achieved.

    Dry Sowing for Quicker Feed

    farmer sewing in dry paddock Jennifer Ingall ABC320Northern Tablelands Local Land Services Agronomists, Georgie Oakes and Jeff Lowien note that dry sowing of winter cereal forage crops is an option that a number of producers are considering to achieve quicker feed for when it does rain.

    Obviously there are risks involved but for quite a few it may be worth a punt, at least for a portion of your planned area of cereal forage crops.

    Image - Dry sowing winter cereal forage crops is an option that some farmers are considering at the moment. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Ingall, ABC.

    Help on the Ground for Bush Fire Affected Farmers

    Fires Near MeLocal Land Services veterinary officers and biosecurity staff are on the ground assisting communities affected by bush fires. They are primarily dealing with animal welfare-related issues.

    Access to the fire grounds due to safety concerns is limiting the ability to assess the full extent of the damage, however the number of stock losses is expected to grow over the coming days as landowners gain access to their properties.

    Landholders who need assistance with emergency fodder, livestock or domestic animal assessment should call the Ag and Animal Services Hotline on 1800 814 647.

    Image - the Firest Near Me App for smart phones provides detailed information and updates on all firest in NSW.

    Landcare Member Shares Drought Management Strategy

    Cows1 320p

    Recent media stories of dry conditions affecting New South Wales and Queensland have shown the depressing conditions that seem to go hand in hand with the regular onset of dry weather in Australia, but this New England grazier and Southern New England Landcare Member, has an alternative approach to drought management...

    How to 'Unstress' when Evolution Bites Back

    Ron Ehrlich Headshot 320p

    If you've ever wondered how gut health, epigenetics, ethical food choices, low-toxicity living, chemical sensitivity, chronic fatigue syndrome, resilient cities and regenerative agriculture relate to holistic dentistry and human health, this is your chance to find out!

    Special guest speaker, Dr Ron Ehrlich, an Holistic Dentist from Sydney and founder of Nourishing Australia, will present “Evolution Bites Back” at the Southern New England Landcare Member Muster on Thursday evening 21st February.

    The seminar will explore key drivers of human success in evolution, how these drivers are coming back to bite us in our busy modern lives and constructive ways to manage the resulting challenges. All members and friends are welcome!

    Tails Wagging on the Research Trail

    Baxter Detection Dog320When attempting to sniff out solutions to learn more about Australia’s biodiversity such as koala populations, what better way than to enlist man’s best friend for the job?

    Detection dogs may not spring to mind as the first thing we think about when looking for koala habitat, but Northern Tablelands Local Land Services has commissioned a team of researchers from the University of the Sunshine Coast to find out more about local koalas.

    Bell's Turtles Forever in Our Region

    Bells Turtle hatchling captive rearing programThe ‘Turtles Forever’ project, now in its third year of the ten-year project, is providing protection for the endangered Bell’s Turtle which is only found in the Namoi, Deepwater, Gwydir and Severn River systems.

    Australian Agriculture - Vicious to Virtuous?

    Vicious to virtuous cycles 2015IMAGEInterested in a regenerative agriculture that can change the future of Australia's landscapes and economies? "The underlying resource base of Australian agriculture has been gripped in a cycle of decline for decades," states Ogilvy, Kulkarni and Hurley (2015).

    The authors assert that Australian agriculture is trapped for the most part in a vicious cycle that they describe and illustrate clearly. They then envision another way: a strategic future for Australian agriculture that embraces a virtuous cycle.

    This report is highly recommended reading for anyone interested in the broader regenerative agriculture discussion: download the report here Sue Ogilvy, Dr Anand Kulkarni, Sam Hurley, 2015. "From vicious to virtuous cycles: a sustainable future for Australian agriculture", A Discussion Paper, Centre for Policy Development.

     

    Malpas Catchment – support available for pasture monitoring

    Rachel Lawrence SmallThe recent rainfall has given much of the Malpas Catchment a bit of a break from the dry conditions we’ve all been experiencing. Fingers crossed the good conditions continue. Whether or not they do though, pasture monitoring and feed budgeting is an essential tool to plan into the future.

    Rachel Lawrence, Malpas Catchment Coordinator, has experience with pasture species identification (both native and exotic) and monitoring of pasture biomass and condition of the ground and litter layer. Rachel is available to provide support to small groups within the Malpas area who would like to implement pasture monitoring and feed budgeting. Rachel would work with graziers to follow the methodology put in place by Dr Judi Earl and Dr Lewis Kahn from Agricultural Information and Monitoring Services (AIMSAG). Small groups of three or so people is ideal, fewer is ok, but preferably no larger.

    If this is of interest to you, please contact Rachel via email  or at the Southern New England Landcare office on 02 6772 9123.

    GGTP Sponsors Biological Farming Conference

    SNELANDCAREadvertSmallGrass Grower's Tea Party (fondly known as GGTP), a sub-group of Southern New England Landcare Ltd, is proud to announce it's Silver Sponsorship of the 2018 Australian Biological Farming Conference & Expo to be held at Southern Cross University on the Gold Coast from 9-12 November 2018.

    Grass Grower’s Tea Party, an Armidale-based group formed in 2001, coordinated the highly successful 2005 conference ‘People in the Landscape—Produce it, Protect it, Proft’.

    More than 300 delegates experienced Allan Savory (Savory Institute), Arron Wood (2001 Young Australian of the Year), Constance Neely (USA) and Dick Richardson (South African Holistic Management educator) on:

    • education for environmental change
    • regenerative land management
    • learning from the land and more than 120 delegates visited Tim Wright’s property ‘Lana’.

    Now, GGTP is 'paying it forward' to help make this event one not to be missed!

    Download the conference flier here and the program here. Visit https://www.australianbiologicalfarmingconference.org/ for more information.

    SNELandcare Members may be able to obtain free tickets (conditions apply).

    Southern New England Landcare’s mission is to lead, connect and enable our communities to reach their sustainability goals and we continue to champion the adoption of regenerative agricultural practices.

    Raising funds for Regent Honeyeater Recovery

     

    Regent Honeyeater WEBThe National Twitchathon is BirdLife Australia's spring race for bird conservation. It's a friendly competition in which teams of birders race to see or hear as many bird species as possible in a set time, while raising funds for BirdLife's crucial conservation and research projects.

    Free Tickets: Australian Biological Farming Conference

    BFCLogoWould you like to attend the Australian Biological Farming Conference & Expo on the Gold Coast 10-11 November 2018? Southern New England Landcare has a further TWO FREE TICKETS to give away!

    The first two current financial members of Southern New England Landcare who email Karen Zirkler, stating why they would like to attend and the speaker they are most looking forward to seeing will receive the tickets, worth $440 each. The recipients of the free tickets will also be asked to provide a photograph and a short paragraph on their conference highlight for our next edition of Landchat. Note, only one free ticket per couple please.

    Serrated Tussock a Serious Threat in Current Conditions

    Serrated tussock320Serrated tussock is a weed of national significance. Highly adapted to a range of environments, it seeds prolifically and is difficult to control. The wind spreads large volumes of seed across long distances, allowing new populations to establish over large areas.

    Jonathan Lawson, Regional Weeds Coordinator at Northern Tablelands Local Land Services, cautions against the threat and is keen to emphasise the serious risk it presents to the Northern Tablelands grazing system.  

    We proudly present our supporters

    Subscribe with us

    I wish to receive SNELandcare's monthly e-News to stay abreast of upcoming landcare opportunities. I understand I can unsubscribe any time.
    Become a member to also receive our quarterly Landchat newsletter showcasing the great achievements of our members. Click on the Membership menu above to join.

    Connect with us

    Advertise with us

    advert banner